September 23, 2011


An ROI analysis is the “why buy at all” segment that is of high significance when relating to the buyer. It is a strategic, honest way of giving the buyer a glimpse at how you can bring them success.

Most purchases are made to either solve problems (pain) or grow business (gain). 40% of solutions to these problems can be expressed in financial terms. Top decision makers almost always look at ROI for decision-making. So, instead of just proposing your price to the buyer, justify the investment by expressing how quickly it will pay for itself. This will help they buyer focus on how much will be made and saved rather than how much it will initially cost. Your job is to show the buyer how taking no action costs more than funding your proposal.

When offering ROI examples, think about top-line and bottom-line benefits. Typical hard ROI metric examples:

  • Improved quality
  • Longer-term warranty
  • Increased lead conversion
  • Faster new product start-up time
  • Reduced installation time
  • Reduced maintenance time
  • Reduced labor costs
  • Reduced energy costs
  • Easier on the earth

Remember that buyers aren’t just looking for products or services; they’re looking for ROI. Therefore, always sell your company’s sizzle rather than the steak. Put their uneasiness to rest by letting them know they your offerings will offer them sustained return on investment. By the end, the buyer should feel confident that no other competitor will be able to offer tangible ROI, other than you.